Easter, every day

Christians proclaim “He is risen” one day a year. The tomb is empty. Sins are forgiven. Good Friday is defeated. Jesus lives forever.

So what?

I’m serious. If Easter is a one-day celebration, what’s the big deal?

Here’s a reminder: Easter is a 24-hours-a-day, 365-days-a-year event. We should post these “He is risen” memes every day.

The effects of that Easter morning about 2,000 years ago reverberate into the 21st century. It’s far from a one-time event.

All in

For some, “religion” is a once-a-week thing. Show up for an hour, give an offering, I’m good for the week.

risen 5Nothing in the Bible, which explains Easter in detail, allows for that. Jesus is an all-or-nothing relationship. Jesus gave his life for us. He didn’t have to, but he cares for us that much.

 

The Bible demands we do the same. Follow in Jesus’ footsteps, if you will. Give to those less fortunate, time and money. Serve widows and orphans (those groups are mentioned by name more than once.)

With our schedules turned upside down by the novel coronavirus, how are we doing?

There’s a high school junior near here who plays the bagpipes each evening for his neighbors. Many of us call or text people we haven’t connected with in awhile – I’ve received a few of those calls too. We donate to food banks. We make masks for hospitals and other first responders. We buy groceries for our elderly neighbors.

Many people are serving orphans, widows and others very well during this time of need. It’s heart-warming to see.

Just the beginning

What will happen when stay-in-place orders are lifted? Will we continue serving our neighbors? I hope so.

Or will we go back to our old habits? Traditionally we go from crisis to crisis, forgetting any lessons learned as we make our living, feed our families and hope we get some free time on the weekend.

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Easter has come and gone, and we don’t talk about it anymore. We should. Every day.

Jesus had 12 disciples in his inner circle, men who left their families and professions to follow him and learn from him. After the resurrection, their lives were transformed.

They couldn’t stop talking about it. They faced opposition, torture and even death. Didn’t matter. They kept talking and living their new lives, because now they had a purpose that transcended themselves.

Easter was not the final word. Easter was just the beginning of their story.

And ours.

New priorities

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They lived differently. They shared their possessions with each other. Not because a virus forced them to, but because their faith in the risen Savior encouraged them to share.

They did so without even thinking about it. Their priorities had changed that dramatically. They held on to their own possessions loosely. They supported themselves and their families, and shared their surplus with widows and orphans, and others.

They did something else, too. They talked about their new-found faith with everyone they could. Some believed; many did not. That’s the way it goes.

The power of Easter

I just finished a lengthy study of the book of Acts, where those first disciples (and many others) received God’s Holy Spirit at Pentecost, which helped them understand what Jesus had done.

One of the stars of Acts is Paul, an intellectual religious figure who knew the Scriptures and persecuted these new “Christians” because they weren’t behaving appropriately. Paul, however, had a dramatic encounter with the resurrected Jesus that changed his life overnight.

Some Christians today have a similar experience. For others, faith is a gradual process. God knows our hearts and what it will take for each of us to find him. He’s patient, and creative. But he won’t force you (or anyone else) to follow him.

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If your eyes get opened like those first apostles’ eyes did at Pentecost, look out! Your life will change. Forever.

That’s the power of Easter.

The apostle Paul was given a very clear mission: “… for (Paul) is an instrument whom I have chosen to bring my name before Gentiles and kings and before the people of Israel.” (Acts 9:15)

Paul did that for the rest of his life. He was imprisoned for his faith. He was beaten. He was kicked out of town. He was shipwrecked.

Through it all, he kept his eyes on Jesus.

And he preached. That was his mission.

What did he preach? The resurrection of Jesus. Over and over and over. In synagogues, in city halls, in the streets, in private homes, on an island, in prison … he kept preaching.

 

“For I decided to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ, and him crucified.”

Paul, in 1 Corinthians 2:2

 

Paul, if he lived today, probably would have graduated from Harvard. Very smart, very intellectual. For a man like that to say he would proclaim only the resurrection of Jesus – everything else was a waste of time (“I count it all as loss”) – was astounding.

This is what the empty tomb does.

Paul did not throw away his intellect or intelligence. His focus changed, that’s all. No longer did he spend his time trying to follow all the rules and regulations of his religion, which was an impossible task anyway. Now, he followed Jesus – and talked about the cross and the empty tomb.

Paul used the gifts and talents that God gave him to worship God and live for him. We as believers today do that too. Every single day, not just on Easter.

He is risen. He is risen today. And every day.

That tomb will never contain Jesus’ body again.

Go ahead and look. You won’t find it.

Instead, you will find Jesus alive – in a different form, as the Holy Spirit – in your heart. Jesus the Son of God has returned to heaven, where he holds a place at his father’s right hand (Acts 7:55, Romans 8:34, Ephesians 1:20 and other places).

This is why Christians worship the living God today. The tomb is empty.

Easter has just begun.

The circle of life in one day

A young couple I know announced their first pregnancy.

A (slightly) older couple celebrated their anniversary.

A friend’s son is hoping to get into an addiction detox center.

Another friend’s younger brother died from complications of a stroke.

I received word of all four events on the same day.

The circle of life.

Birth, anniversary, struggle, death.

I received word of those events in that order, ironically.

The first two were announcements of joy.

Birth

New life is a miracle. It happens the same way every time, but it’s still a miracle. One cell becomes two, then four, then … a living, soon-to-be-breathing human being.

I still remember the birth of our first son. I held a camera in my hands to take photos of the new arrival.

I was so in awe of the moment of David’s birth, I froze. The nurse shaped her hands like a camera and pantomimed taking a picture. I snapped out of my reverie and took a few frames.

Our lives changed forever.

New birth does that.

Anniversary

Anniversaries are special, too, as the couple celebrates thriving through the inevitable ups and downs of marriage – hopefully more ups.

Long-lasting marriages tend to stand out in today’s society, don’t they?

Marriage is not easy, and involves plenty of compromises. But if husband and wife are both committed to the relationship, it grows and deepens.

That’s the ideal, anyway.

The second two events were presented as prayer requests.

Struggle

My friend has prayed for years that her son would overcome his addiction. Apparently, the severe side effects have finally forced him to seek help.

Sometimes we have to hit rock bottom before we can get better.

I’ve thought about that every so often over the years. Do I have to hit rock bottom before my life can truly change? Why else would I ask Jesus Christ to change me, if I didn’t realize I needed changing?

I’ve never had a chemical dependency (except for the caffeine in coffee, I admit it) or faced a crisis for which I see no way out.

Or, have I?

When my family moved out of state before my ninth-grade year, I was afraid. Since I knew no one in my new school on the first day of class, I searched for something or someone to lean on – and found nothing. The following summer, I was introduced to Jesus in a very personal way, and that began a lifelong process of getting to know Him as my Lord as well as my Savior.

In a sense, then, I did hit rock bottom. I reached a point where I knew I needed something I didn’t have. This is not envy or jealousy. No material possession was going to answer my deepest need.

My friend’s son is at that point too, whether he realizes it or not. If he eventually comes clean from his addiction, that would be a wonderful answer to prayer. But then what? How would he fill that vacuum in his life? The answer to that would determine whether he relapses or not.

That’s down the road for him. Life is a process, not a one-time-decision-live-happily-ever-after moment.

Our pastor, in his current sermon series, calls this “discipleship.” It’s the lifelong process of growing ever closer to God after making the decision to follow Him.

We find our purpose in life through that process. The end game is very real, but so is the journey.

Where are we going?

Addictions are extremely difficult to break. You and I both have seen this over and over.

Experience is not always the best teacher. Not all experiences are worth having. Why can’t we learn from the mistakes of others?

Death

Eventually, we all die. It’s inevitable. Our bodies will wear out sooner or later, unless something unforeseen takes our lives suddenly.

Strokes happen to many people, but that doesn’t make it any easier to accept. My father-in-law suffered a heart attack followed by a stroke in his mid-50s that incapacitated him. For a man who owned a business and was a leader in his field, that was a difficult pill for him to swallow. He lived for about 15 years after that.

My friend’s brother survived only a couple of days after his stroke.

Either way, life is not fair, is it?

Every one of us can lament something. Perhaps it’s physical health, a relationship that didn’t work out or is causing us pain, a job loss, family issues … something traumatic and/or something chronic. Each of us can identify something that we’re lamenting.

Choices

How do we handle such struggles? With grace and optimism, or with anger and blame?

Do we seek help when necessary? Or do we fight through it, unwilling to even admit our issues? Frequently this is my problem. I am not good at asking for assistance, even though there are a number of people in my life I could turn to if I truly needed them.

But it’s hard to admit need, isn’t it?

Which brings us back to the baby our friends are expecting next summer.

So pure, so beautiful, so dependent … that’s what babies are.

What kind of a world will he or she be born into? Will that baby know joy, or sorrow?

Probably both. The soon-to-be parents know Jesus as their Savior and Lord, so their child will get off to a great start. He or she will be loved and will learn to love in the deepest sense of that word.

As the child grows, he or she will learn the struggles of life, and hopefully how to overcome them.

There will be anniversaries, and eventually death.

The circle of life continues.

Is your circle bright, or is it gray like the rain – or worse, black?

The night is blackest as it nears dawn. Sunrise is coming.

Eventually, the rain will stop, the clouds will disappear and the sun will shine brightly.

In these days of partial sun and plenty of clouds and rain, I’m preparing for full sunshine. Are you?

Re-thinking church in an inner city

I’ve never been involved in a church plant before. There’s plenty of hope and excitement, but we don’t even know all the challenges we will face.

Our multi-campus church is planning to open a new campus in Lorain, Ohio, a self-described “international city” of about 63,000 people on the shores of Lake Erie about 30 miles west of Cleveland. As of 2016, whites comprised 51.7 percent of the city’s population, Hispanics 29.1 percent, blacks 14.5 percent and “two or more races” 3.1 percent.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Lorain-Ohio.html

I’m interested in this because my wife and I raised our three sons at an inner-city church in Saginaw, Michigan, with similar demographics to Lorain. Now that they are grown and on their own, I have more time to devote to this.

To learn more about planting a multi-ethnic church, the Lorain campus pastor and I attended a three-day conference on the topic in Chicago. It was eye-opening.

As a former newspaper guy, I took lots of notes. Here is a summary from the plenary speakers and workshop leaders I heard:

Church and society

If we want to be a multi-ethnic church, then the dominant culture cannot be more than 80 percent of the church. Research shows that if visitors see at least 20 percent of people in their ethnic group attending, then they feel like “members” and not “visitors.”  We should be strategic about seeking 20 percent of an ethnic group if we truly want to be multi-ethnic.

For some people, society does not work – economically, medically, socially, religiously, etc. These people do not trust any institutions. Church plants will take a long time for these people to trust. They may reject institutionalism, even if they hunger for God. To reach them, we might need to change the way we do church – why 11 a.m. services? Why does communion happen weekly or monthly? Etc. These are not wrong, but they are not in the Bible. What’s Biblical, and what’s cultural?

The new national divide is achiever vs. non-achiever. Achievers value the individual; non-achievers value the society. Most non-whites (as well as whites) are achievers. Achievers are mainstream; non-achievers live in the sub-culture.

Doing church

One speaker said white pastors are excellent at “three-point sermons with seven sub-points.” That’s fine, but that’s not how black preachers preach. If we want to reach black people, this might become an issue. Another example: Hispanics will show up late, then they will stay late. That’s their culture. We might need to re-think the way we do church.

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The traditional church model: Meet Jesus, attend church, connect/serve/give, go into the world. This isn’t working; it’s too shallow.

The new model: Meet Jesus, attend church, deep change, go into the world.

How to accomplish deep change? We need to meet emotional, social, intellectual, physical and spiritual needs – all of them.  Which means all of those needs in my life, as a leader, must be met as well, or I will not be an effective leader. The Mary-Martha struggle: When are we focused on our actions at the expense of spending time with Jesus?

This is not a quick fix. It’s hard. It takes time.

Most people in our cities aren’t thinking about repentance, but about where their next meal is coming from. We must disciple them to conversion. We must offer Bible nuggets that people can relate to. “There’s a guy in the Bible who understands what you are going through …” (This means we have to know the Bible well, of course.)

Value in all cultures

Whites frequently will not get involved in a church (or any other organization) unless they lead it. Several speakers made this point. Whites often don’t leave room for other ethnic groups to lead – or if they do, they must follow the examples of whites. We often do this unconsciously.

There is no assimilating into one true culture in heaven. All cultures are good. Faith brings out the best in all of them. Every culture has stories to tell.

How much of church planting is led by whiteness? Most of it. It’s a strange mix of benevolence and oppression. This has become the only story. How do we liberate from whiteness (or any dominant culture)? According to the Bible, we die to it. We are not to assimilate, but to create a new story.

Jesus’ blood is the new story, for all cultures. His death and resurrection is the great equalizer for all of us. Jesus didn’t ask us to become Him. Instead, He became one of us.

Those of us in the dominant culture often forget that we have a culture. Everybody speaks with an accent except me, for example.

Marginalization happens when people are minimized in different ways. Marginalization often leads to oppression, which is defined as sin plus power.

Jesus went to the margins. He was surrounded by sinners and tax collectors and prostitutes and women and children. All of us need to go there, too.

Jesus gave us a table, and all the chairs around it are on the same level. No high chairs and low chairs. Everybody drinks from the same cup, and we share germs. All ethnic groups are equal before God.

History is not over

Blacks’ history is slavery. No other immigrant group can say that. We heard first-person testimonies from several ethnic minorities who have experienced racism in their lifetimes. My wife has a co-worker whose boyfriend is black. He recently was talking with several friends in the parking lot of the apartment complex in Lorain where he lives. Another resident of the apartment complex called the cops on him. His crime? Being black and talking with his friends. It happens still today, even in Lorain.

As white people, we cannot deny that these things happened, and are still happening. If we want to reach this population for Christ, we need to meet them where they are.

Perceptions

lasalle street

Another cultural difference: Whites often see themselves as a collection of individuals. Blacks see themselves as a community. This is crucial to understanding how we communicate differently.

For example, a white police officer in Houston recently killed a black man in his own apartment. Blacks wanted the world to feel his suffering and pain. They wanted pastors to talk about that the following Sunday. Our reaction as whites? We want more facts. Give us the details of what happened before we react.

This is huge. We must understand this difference.

Critique the culture

Cities – with density and proximity – amplify the opposition to the gospel.

There is little social pressure anymore to attend church. There are four basic religious beliefs, but some Americans don’t even have these:

  1. There is a god.
  2. There is moral truth.
  3. There is sin.
  4. There is an afterlife.

How do we evangelize in this setting?

We must critique the culture. The standards our culture offers don’t work. If your career is your primary motivator in life, what happens when – not if, but when – you lose it? If it’s to be a good person, you’ll never be good enough (maybe you haven’t committed adultery, but have you lusted? This is Jesus’ standard.) If it’s freedom, you aren’t, and you know it. If you live for money, you’ll never have enough. If you seek beauty, you’ll never feel beautiful. And on and on.

But if you serve Jesus, you’ll get forgiveness when you fail.

There are no merit-based scholarships in heaven. Only grace.

Also, there is no defense against:

  1. Prayers of the saints.
  2. Love of the saints.
  3. Wise application of the word of God to your concerns.